Elementum Ventus How To Calibrate the Compass?

In case you’ve wondered how exactly to calibrate the compass of your lovely Ventus, here is a nice and fast video tutorial about it.

Suunto Elementum Aqua Video Review

HD video review of Suunto Elementum Aqua. Enjoy.

Suunto Elementum Terra Video Review

Here is a nice video review of the Terra!

Suunto Elementum Aqua Review

The Suunto Elementum Aqua came in a discrete black cube, with just one word written on: “SUUNTO.” The one I was given has black case, black rubber band, and positive face. The black case is stainless 316L, the common “marine grade metal,” and is very stylish. From some distance it could look like a classy dark G-Shock watch. Actually a friend of mine made precisely this comment; nevertheless a good look unveils its originality. The 41mm frame has eight hex screws and its combination with the sapphire glass and the curved case remind me of the viewing port of an atmospheric scuba diving suit. In fact I do think that here is the most incredible feature of the watch, despite the fact that it resembles the bezel of a UTS model, the execution by Suunto seems wonderful.

A different distinctive characteristic of the watch may be the big crown pusher at two o’ clock, the one feature that’s shared between all of the Elementum instruments. Being bigger than the simple pusher at 3 o’ clock, it really sticks out, incorporating an additional touch of various design culture. The crystal has yellowish circular and linear marks which determine the measurements taken under water. The 2 yellow lines help to notify about the present and maximum depth, as well as the dive time, while the circular marking is the analogue temperature scale.Suunto Elementum Aqua 2

Suunto Elementum Aqua operates in a couple of modes: TIME and DIVE mode. The time function is really quite simple, the hour and the mins are placed at the middle of the display, while at the end of the display the date is discovered. Don’t question the reading of seconds, the main display lacks it, despite the empty higher part of the display which may supply the perfect room for this reading. The explanation for this omission may be a shot to avoid the refreshing of the display each second and save some battery. The setup of the time requires pushing the crown for a few mere seconds. Then the time, date, and alarm set up is extremely easy by screwing the crown clockwise or anti-clockwise.
Yet another useful feature of the watch is a button locking mechanism function, which can be triggered by pushing the two pushers together. In addition, by pressing the center pusher firmly in any mode, the backlight is triggered.

Suunto Elementum Ventus Review

In comparison with Swiss design, the Finnish have made quite a competitive watch. The case of the Suunto Elementum Ventus is world class with a “carved not stamped” experience to it. I value the sapphire crystal, but I am let down that it’s nor glare-proofed neither domed. Consequently in a pinch, you can use it as a mirror to fix your hair.
The pushers function very well, even though much lauded “revolving A pusher” looks a little less than “swiss rugged” if you ask me.
The display…. okay, after years of Swiss timepieces which wonderfully pulled off legible negative displays, I do not “get it” with this particular watch. Why can’t Suunto produce a negative display with enough clarity and contrast to compete with the likes of a Breitling, TAG or RADO? Coming from my own limited knowledge of LCD technology, the main difference between a positive and a negative display will be the polarizing filter. There’s not much else to it. So I am puzzled why this is so difficult to read.
I’m satisfied with the function of the watch. Suunto seems to have sought to make this particular watch as simple as possible! You will find essentially 4 modes.The particular main time display that may show either barometric pressure numerically or, within the same area, display the dat. The barometric record, which is utilized by rotating the A pusher counter clockwise and scrolls the baro chart by hour increment. The compass, available via the C pusher in all modes with the exception of when the “race timer” is going; and also the race timer itself.

Suunto Elementum Ventus 2

The count down chronograph is quite… difficult. It resets to zero by holding the C pusher after it has been ended by pressing the A pusher. As soon as zeroed, it assumes 5 mins as the start time, even though it is possible to rotate the A pusher to regulate this by minute steps. If set to zero, it functions like a modest chronograph. Why modest? It counts 10ths of seconds until 1 minute, and then switches to minutes and seconds, and to minutes only. As for the last mode, it’s impossible to detect it is still going without catching a digit change. Unlike the “regular” convention of flashing the “:” to indicate a going chronograph, the “:” is static. Furthermore unlucky is that, whenever halted, the watch won’t show the greater precise readings. Compare this to an Aerospace Watch, where when the chronograph is ceased, the timepiece alternates in between showing the minutes and the seconds, to enable you to at least gain access to the level of accuracy kept in the watch.

In comparison with Swiss design, the Finnish have made quite a competitive watch. The case of the Suunto Elementum Ventus is world class with a “carved not stamped” experience to it. I value the sapphire crystal, but I am let down that it’s nor glare-proofed neither domed. Consequently in a pinch, you can use it as a mirror to fix your hair.
The pushers function very well, even though much lauded “revolving A pusher” looks a little less than “swiss rugged” if you ask me.
The display…. okay, after years of Swiss timepieces which wonderfully pulled off legible negative displays, I do not “get it” with this particular watch. Why can’t Suunto produce a negative display with enough clarity and contrast to compete with the likes of a Breitling, TAG or RADO? Coming from my own limited knowledge of LCD technology, the main difference between a positive and a negative display will be the polarizing filter. There’s not much else to it. So I am puzzled why this is so difficult to read. I’m satisfied with the function of the watch. Suunto seems to have sought to make this particular watch as simple as possible! You will find essentially 4 modes.The particular main time display that may show either barometric pressure numerically or, within the same area, display the dat. The barometric record, which is utilized by rotating the A pusher counter clockwise and scrolls the baro chart by hour increment. The compass, available via the C pusher in all modes with the exception of when the “race timer” is going; and also the race timer itself.Suunto Elementum Ventus 3
The count down chronograph is quite… difficult. It resets to zero by holding the C pusher after it has been ended by pressing the A pusher. As soon as zeroed, it assumes 5 mins as the start time, even though it is possible to rotate the A pusher to regulate this by minute steps. If set to zero, it functions like a modest chronograph. Why modest? It counts 10ths of seconds until 1 minute, and then switches to minutes and seconds, and to minutes only. As for the last mode, it’s impossible to detect it is still going without catching a digit change. Unlike the “regular” convention of flashing the “:” to indicate a going chronograph, the “:” is static. Furthermore unlucky is that, whenever halted, the watch won’t show the greater precise readings. Compare this to an Aerospace Watch, where when the chronograph is ceased, the timepiece alternates in between showing the minutes and the seconds, to enable you to at least gain access to the level of accuracy kept in the watch.

Suunto Elementum Terra Review

Suunto Elementum Terra will come in a nice, serious, painted cardboard package, that is perfectly lined. Inside the box is a manual, a plastic-type warrantee card, plus a polishing/cleaning cloth.

My very first impression was that the watch was heavier, but smaller than my Suunto Vector and Suunto Core. It does feel a little thicker though. It’s an extremely nice, formal watch. After placing it on, it doesn’t come across as too weighty. Its got a good weight to it.
Case and Crystal:
The Suunto Terra’s case uses stainless steel, having a matte/satin finish to it. It appears really nicely manufactured, and very strong. You will find 3 buttons on the right hand side, that all move quite good. Firm, however with no click. The top button is also a scroll wheel, for scrolling through menus and making adjustments. I wish my Suunto Core had one. The scroller also goes effortlessly, with confirmation clicks.The case is water resistant to 100m (~300 feet) and according to the manual, the buttons May be pressed underwater.The Terra face is a flat, sapphire crystal, which also comes with an anti-glare layer on it.The buttons seem to stand out a lttle bit, but in practice they just do not get in the way, or pressed by accident.Suunto Elementum Terra 2
Strap:
The Suunto Terra come with several different bands, leather, steel, or rubber. Mine came with a pleasant dark leather band. It has some white stitching around the edge of it, that actually sets it off beautifully. The band is quite thick and strong, but is still comfortable.
Display:
The Terra I managed to get has a positive display, that i like It’s also provided with a negative display, in case you like that better.The Suunto Terra uses a classical segment display for numbers, similar to the Suunto Vector. Thus, it won’t plot out any charts/graphs of the elevation or air pressure like the Suunto Core does. The backlight is incredibly bright. Much better than I’ve ever seen on any Suunto watch.
Functions:
Suunto has not surprisingly kept the capabilities of the Elementum Terra to a minimum. I’m confident that’s simply because it’s actually intended to be a luxury dress watch. It is something to wear to the office or a party, but will still operate out in the wild, although not as well as the Core.
The Terra has only 2 modes, Time/Altimeter and Compass. The main display of the Terra shows a lot of information. In the top row, you will get the current elevation, the center row provides you with the time, and the bottom row shows the day. Towards the top of the screen, you have the pressure trend arrows, and around the perimeter you get the sea-level barometric pressure. The face of the Terra doesn’t need a rotatable bezel such as the Vector or Core. Rather, a circular graph is present for reading the Sea-Level barometric pressure.

Suunto Elementum Terra will come in a nice, serious, painted cardboard package, that is perfectly lined. Inside the box is a manual, a plastic-type warrantee card, plus a polishing/cleaning cloth.
My very first impression was that the watch was heavier, but smaller than my Suunto Vector and Suunto Core. It does feel a little thicker though. It’s an extremely nice, formal watch. After placing it on, it doesn’t come across as too weighty. Its got a good weight to it.
Case and Crystal:The Suunto Terra’s case uses stainless steel, having a matte/satin finish to it. It appears really nicely manufactured, and very strong. You will find 3 buttons on the right hand side, that all move quite good. Firm, however with no click. The top button is also a scroll wheel, for scrolling through menus and making adjustments. I wish my Suunto Core had one. The scroller also goes effortlessly, with confirmation clicks.The case is water resistant to 100m (~300 feet) and according to the manual, the buttons May be pressed underwater.The Terra face is a flat, sapphire crystal, which also comes with an anti-glare layer on it.The buttons seem to stand out a lttle bit, but in practice they just do not get in the way, or pressed by accident.Suunto Elementum Terra 3
Strap:The Suunto Terra come with several different bands, leather, steel, or rubber. Mine came with a pleasant dark leather band. It has some white stitching around the edge of it, that actually sets it off beautifully. The band is quite thick and strong, but is still comfortable.
Display:The Terra I managed to get has a positive display, that i like It’s also provided with a negative display, in case you like that better.The Suunto Terra uses a classical segment display for numbers, similar to the Suunto Vector. Thus, it won’t plot out any charts/graphs of the elevation or air pressure like the Suunto Core does. The backlight is incredibly bright. Much better than I’ve ever seen on any Suunto watch.
Functions:Suunto has not surprisingly kept the capabilities of the Elementum Terra to a minimum. I’m confident that’s simply because it’s actually intended to be a luxury dress watch. It is something to wear to the office or a party, but will still operate out in the wild, although not as well as the Core.The Terra has only 2 modes, Time/Altimeter and Compass. The main display of the Terra shows a lot of information. In the top row, you will get the current elevation, the center row provides you with the time, and the bottom row shows the day. Towards the top of the screen, you have the pressure trend arrows, and around the perimeter you get the sea-level barometric pressure. The face of the Terra doesn’t need a rotatable bezel such as the Vector or Core. Rather, a circular graph is present for reading the Sea-Level barometric pressure.